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PLASMA MAGAZINE

Published in Issue Nr. 3
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Phase2Phase

Phase2Phase – Cindy Hammer, Susan Schubert (go plastic company) and Florian Stenger, Axel Voigt (Mathematics)

A visual and kinesthetic space to experience, an interaction between body and structure in realtime.

The calculated bi-continuous structure, visualized by a projection on the floor, is influenced by movement. Initially recognizable as digital and organic textures (projection – 2-dimensional, and human body – 3-dimensional), they interlace, melt, blend to more than the sum of their individual parts. The positions and movements of the performer/visitor get captured by a camera and detected through a tracking algorithm. Corresponding to the acquired information, simulation results to segregate two fluids will be interpolated appropriately in order to keep a bi-continuous structure of the fluid phases, however, the density assimilates into the structure and thus adapts its intensity. Cindy Hammer and Susan Schubert activated the interactive space with a Performance at the Vernissage of the exhibition „Realtime“ on December 15th, 2017 at the Technische Sammlungen Dresden. In this case, not only reacted the structure to the dancers but they in turn approached the manifold qualities of the space through the methods of movement improvisation. Thus, the relationship between the dancers and the structure describes two entities that exist within and between each other. The underlying mathematic equations not only serve the calculation of the fluid-phases, they also constitute the base for the processing of different strings and conditions, characteristics and sequences in a score. According to these conditions, the two bodies correspond to the structure, to the space, and in time and resonance to the surrounding audience . The applied physical conditions are generated by the simulation results, the consequences of the performance environment and the live dynamics between the dancers, the recipients and the participants during the performance. The physical base of the development of the fluid phases lies in the surface energy of the boundary surface of both phases. This is modelled via a phase-field-model and simulated on high performance processors by means of Finite Elements Methods. Mathematicians Florian Stenger and Axel Voigt have implemented the methods so that they meet the real-time requirements of the interaction. This contribution was distinguished by the KUWI 2017, the Art – and Science Award of the City of Dresden.

 

PLASMA magazine

picture: Nils Stelte, CRTD

PLASMA magazine

picture: Nils Stelte, CRTD

PLASMA magazine

picture: Nils Stelte, CRTD

PLASMA magazine

picture: Anna Tiessen, Technical Collections Dresden

 

 

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